Providing Comprehensive Anesthesia Care for the Front Range
1-866-491-1244

Acute and Chronic Pain Management Services

The anesthesiologists of BVA are skilled at providing acute pain management services to patients during and immediately following surgery.  We also offer complete Chronic Pain Services – please click here to be re-directed for these services.

There is good evidence that controlling acute pain both during and after surgery contribute to the healing process.  Good pain control not only helps with the healing process, but can help reduce potential complications such as pneumonia and pulmonary embolisms as patients are able to get up and moving much sooner.  It also reduces the amount of pain medications, and the side effects from these medications, allowing for less grogginess and a more comfortable recover.

We have many techniques available to us that can help patients achieve high levels of comfort and safety both during and following surgery.  Each patient has a different level of pain perception.  Additionally each surgery inflicts varying amounts of potential pain or discomfort.  Your surgeon and anesthesiologist will communicate prior to your surgery in an effort to determine the amount of pain you may experience post-operatively and what techniques that we may employ that will help reduce this.  Any recommended techniques will tailored for your specific needs.

These techniques may include:

Spinals where medications are placed directly into the spinal fluid and can provide extended pain relief up to 24 or more hours.  Often this includes a narcotic for the pain relief and does not necessarily result in prolonged numb or weak legs.  This is especially popular for total joint replacement surgeries such as total knees or hips.

where medications are placed directly into the spinal fluid and can provide extended pain relief up to 24 or more hours.Often this includes a narcotic for the pain relief and does not necessarily result in prolonged numb or weak legs.This is especially popular for total joint replacement surgeries such as total knees or hips.

Epidurals, including the placement of epidural catheters, can allow for extended pain relief by allowing medications to be placed in the epidural space over several days though a small plastic tube or catheter that may be placed in the operating room and then left in place.

Often this catheter will be attached to a Patient Controlled Epidural Pump (PCEA) that will allow patients to safely administer pain medications themselves by pushing a button on a pump that has been programmed to administer pain medications within upper limits set by your anesthesiologist.  This technique is especially useful for major upper abdominal or chest surgery as well as some lower extremity surgeries.

Interscalene Blocks are blocks where medication is placed near the nerves that go to your shoulder and arm.  This block is especially useful for major shoulder reconstructive surgery, such as Rotator Cuff Repairs.

Femoral Nerve Block is a block of the femoral nerve at the groin level and is especially useful at controlling pain following major knee reconstructive surgery, such as Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL).

Sciatic Nerve blocks such as Popliteal Blocks are useful for post-operative pain control with major foot or ankle surgeries.

Intravenous Patient-Control Analgesia (IV PCA).  This is a special pump used with in-patients that is attached to an intravenous (IV) line in you arm.  It is programmed to administer IV pain medication – which are usually narcotics.  Rather than needing to call an nurse to administer these medications, you will have a button that you can push yourself.  The pump will then automatically administer the pain medications all within safe parameters that limit the amount of medication that will be delivered.  This is a great option that allows you to have control over your medication needs and improves patient satisfaction and overall comfort.

Oral Pain medications are usually prescribed by you surgeon and can be very effective in controlling pain and discomfort.

Not everyone will be candidates for all these procedures.  If you have an interest in any of these services, please discuss with your surgeon and anesthesiologist.  It is also important that you discuss your general health and any medications, such as blood thinners, that may prevent some of these blocks from being done.

Disclaimer

IMPORTANT - This website is intended to provide an introduction to information as it relates to the practice of anesthesiology and is not intended to be construed as medical or anesthesia advice for your or any other particular situation. For additional information please Click Here.